About

Education Makers develop learning communities around maker culture with schools, community organizations, colleges and universities. Maker culture embodies do-it-yourself tinkering using tiny, affordable open-source computers, electronics and recycled items to further sustainability, equity, social innovation, democratization of innovation and community building.

Over the past centuries, education institutions have favoured individual work to learn encapsulated knowledge to prepare learners for the real world. Education Makers are turning this model on its head and engage learners in self-directed experiential learning through risk-tolerant, persistent problem-solving in interdependent communities tackling complex, socially-relevant problems.

Education Makers are grounding their work in research scholarship and community relevance. We create partnerships to engage learners from 9 to 99 years-old into maker-led adventures where almost everything is possible. We are interested in the development of 21st century skills through a community of makers that are becoming the “peopleware” necessary to foster risk-tolerant social innovation in educational communities. We are pioneering inclusive, intergenerational, and collaborative communities to develop world-class expertise in fostering maker-led social innovations grounded in educational theory.

Critical making - 10x10 sheet with generative ideas

Our Approach

The Maker Movement has become a buzzword in schools, colleges, universities, libraries and community centers across the world. If you want to know more about it, see below for a few descriptions and links.

Education Makers work in a collaborative action-research approach with the objective of doing research socially and making research socially relevant. We use a variety of tools, inspired by SAS2 Dialogue (https://www.participatoryactionresearch.net/) to structure dialogue and document learning on-the-fly in a manner that helps participants identify their skills and competencies, solve problems, reach out to stakeholders, and grow together.

Maker Culture is defined as “a contemporary culture or subculture representing a technology-based extension of DIY culture that intersects with hacker culture (which is less concerned with physical objects as it focuses on software) and revels in the creation of new devices as well as tinkering with existing ones” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maker_culture). The Maker Movement has largely been enabled by open-source hardware and software.

Makers thrive in physical spaces such as Makerspaces and Fablabs.  Makerspaces are collaborative work spaces in schools, libraries and community centers where people of all ages can learn to code, use 3D printers, laser cutters, solder, play with circuits, and microcontrollers such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi, use robotics, learn sewing, woodworking, etc (https://www.makerspaces.com/what-is-a-makerspace/). Fablabs, which are spaces equipped for creation, innovation and invention, are proliferating across the world (https://www.fablabs.io/labs/map).

As Education Makers, we work in the Maker Movement framework with partners (schools, colleges, universities, libraries and community centers in the Montreal area and beyond) to build communities of makers and develop 21st century competencies.

Researchers

Ann-Louise Davidson

Ann-Louise Davidson

Principal Investigator

Dr. Ann-Louise Davidson is an Associate Professor of Education, Graduate Program Director for the MA in Educational Technology and the Graduate Diploma in Instructional Technology at Concordia University, and holds a Concordia University Research Chair in Maker Culture. She is Associate Director of the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology and Director of the Milieux makerspace initiative.

Giuliana Cucinelli

Giuliana Cucinelli

Co-Researcher

Giuliana Cucinelli is an assistant professor in the Educational Technology program within the Department of Education. She is co-director of the Communities and Differential Mobilities research cluster of Concordia's Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture, and Technology. Cucinelli's research-creation program focuses on the social, cultural and educational impacts of technology.

Margarida Romero

Margarida Romero

Co-Researcher

Margarida Romero is research director of the Laboratoire d’Innovation et Numérique pour l’Éducation (LINE), a research lab in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL). Professor at Université Nice Sophia Antipolis (France) and research associate at Université Laval (Canada). Her research is oriented towards the inclusive, humanistic and creative uses of technologies (co-design, game design and robotics) for the development of creativity, problem solving, collaboration and computational thinking.

Nadia Naffi

Nadia Naffi

Co-Researcher

Dr. Nadia Naffi is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Université Laval. She holds the Chaire de leadership en enseignement sur la transformation durable des pratiques pédagogiques en contexte numérique. She is the recipient of the Governor General Gold Medal (2018). She was one of the inaugural Concordia Public Scholars, a winner of the SSHRC Storytellers competition (2017), a “Ma Thèse en 180 secondes” laureate, a Concordia University Newsmaker of the Week. She is interested in the empowering and liberating aspects of disruptive pedagogies afforded by maker culture. She is an expert in social inclusion, social integration and social media and specializes in the design of online and offline synchronous and asynchronous training, as well as in interactive learning in a problem-based learning approach.

JorgeSanabria - Jorge C Sanabria

Jorge Sanabria

Co-Researcher

Jorge Sanabria holds a doctorate in Kansei Sciences from the Advanced Research Centre in Neuroscience, Behaviour and Qualia at the University of Tsukuba, Japan. He completed a postdoctoral course at the University of Guadalajara, Mexico, from which he has developed the Gradual Immersion Method, a tech-based approach to promote creative cognition through collaboration. He is currently associate research-professor at the University of Guadalajara, where he focuses on the development of training methods and assessment of 21st century skills in digital fabrication and educational robotics environments.